Building circles of support for people

so that they have a good life even after their parents are no longer here to stand up for them

Building circles of support for people

so that their families have peace of mind about the future

Building circles of support for people

so that they are empowered to realise their aspirations and contribute to their community

Building circles of support for people

so that they form intentional friendships that broaden and enrich their lives

Building circles of support for people

so that they develop stronger links in the wider community

Building circles of support for people

so that they are as fulfilled and happy as they can be

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Research Opportunity: Inviting Siblings Aged 11-16

27 Jul 2017

Do you know someone in this age group who has a brother or sister with a learning disability? If so, they may be interested in joining a research project by Jackie Kelly.

Jackie is a registered learning disability nurse and academic at the University of Hertfordshire. "For my PhD I am looking at sibling relationships where one child in the family has a learning disability," she says. “My interest in sibling relationships stems from my privileged career working with people with intellectual disabilities and their families since 1987. I now also lecture at UH. Several years ago as part of a small empirical study, I explored the views and experience of adult siblings when growing up with a sibling with intellectual disabilities.

"This was a small study but the findings suggested the experience was very individual and I was interested to find out more […]. For this study my aim is to engage with young people between the ages of 11-16 years."

We were delighted to read about this opportunity in the latest newsletter from the Down's Syndrome Association. If you'd like to learn more about this important research and how to participate, here's the link: Research Into Sibling Relationships